Drugged Drivers Increase Fatal Car Accidents Nationwide

December 6, 2010

Out of the 21,798 drivers who were killed in motor vehicle accidents in the United States in 2009, 63 percent of them were tested positive for drugs, and according to a National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) report, 18 percent of them tested positive for drugs.

Drug data was collected Nationwide and analyzed by the NHTSA as part of a Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). The types of drugs reported were over-the-counter medicines, prescription drugs and illicit drugs as well.

Previous reports by the NHTSA have shown that alcohol and drowsiness are some of the leading causes of fatal traffic accidents, but this new report will begin to explore the role that legal and illegal drug use play in accidents. This report has shown that drug involvement in fatal motor vehicle accidents is indeed increasing nationwide. This report will pave the way for more research and could ultimately lead to the establishment of standardized testing methods that would look into drug involvement and fatal accidents.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) has also published various reports that offer a look at roadway risks and show ways that lives can be saved. One IIHS report estimates that 7,440 driver deaths could have been prevented had blood-alcohol content levels been below .08%. The report also states that ignition interlock systems are one way to fight the problem of blood alcohol.

The ultimate solution would be that if you are impaired, whether it be from drowsiness, lack of sleep, alcohol use or legal or illegal drugs, it is best to not get behind the wheel and let someone else drive. Do not put yourself or others at risk of an accident and/or an untimely death. Common sense and caution need to be put at the forefront of your decision making and you need to give your keys to someone else. If you are impaired, Do not drive!

If you were involved in a car accident, call our experienced team of Washington, D.C. product liability lawyers at (202) 785-2244 and set up a free consultation so we can better explain how we may be able to help you and your family protected rights.

E. Coli Contamination Outbreak in Maryland

November 22, 2010

A food poisoning case was filed in Baltimore, Maryland as a result of E. coli contamination found in Baugher’s Orchard Apple Cider. This apple cider is sold in Maryland and Pennsylvania and has since been taken off the market. Consumers are instructed not to drink this cider and to dispose of it immediately. Several cases of E. coli food poisoning were reported.

What is E. coli?
– a bacteria that can survive in an environment with or without air and can produce hair-like structures that allow the bacteria to move and attach to human cells. These bacteria most commonly live in the intestines of animals and humans. Though there are many types of E. coli in the United States, the most common is E. coli O157:H7.

E-Coli Bacterium

Symptoms of E. coli Infections:
– nausea – vomiting – mild fever – stomach cramps, and – diarrhea that is often bloody
If E. coli infections go untreated they can lead to hospitalizations and in rare instances Hemolytic-Uremia Syndrome (HUS), which is a form of kidney failure, that occurs when the toxin/bacteria enters the blood stream. If left untreated, it can lead to dehydration and potentially life-threatening illnesses. However, most adults recover from food poisoning cause by E. coli within a few weeks. Young children and the elderly are at higher risks for more sever illnesses.

The most common type of E. coli is E. coli O157:H7. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that about 70,000 people are affected with this specific type of E. coli each year. This type of E. coli is most commonly associates with hamburger meats; therefore, it is commonly referred to as the hamburger disease. It is also associated with contaminated water, foods and unpasteurized dairy products.

If you believe that you may be suffering from E. coli food poisoning please seek immediate medical attention. The sooner you seek treatment, the lower the risk of potential health complications.